Common Causes and Treatment of Trigger Finger

The condition known as trigger finger is very misleading. Trigger finger doesn’t just happen when you repeatedly fire a gun. Actually, your forefinger is used more than any other digit, and it can easily become injured through repetitive motion. Here are some of the most common causes of trigger finger and how it is treated.

What Is Trigger Finger?

Trigger finger occurs with repetitive motion. There are many tendons in the hands that allow the fingers to move and manipulate objects. If one of those tendons becomes irritated or inflamed, it can cause the finger to curl up at the first joint, with the finger unable to unbend fully. This is traditionally called trigger finger, even though there are many different ways you can injure the tendons.

If left untreated, trigger finger can worsen to the point that you cannot use that finger at all, and you may have difficulties using the other fingers as well. The more inflamed or stretched the tendon becomes, the more movement is restricted. Eventually tissues begin to thicken, further restricting motion.

Trigger finger can be caused by any activity that requires the finger to be curled for a long period of time, which can include sewing and crafting activities.

How Is Trigger Finger Treated?

Trigger finger may be treated in a number of ways. The earlier the symptoms are addressed, the more effective and less dramatic treatment needs to be. For advanced cases of trigger finger or for those who fail to improve with other measures, surgery may be required.

The surgery for trigger finger is actually very simple and only takes about 30 minutes on an outpatient basis. A small incision is made in the palm to gain access to the tendon. The tendon is then released, and the thickening is trimmed. Recovery time is minimal, and you will be able to get back to your life quickly.

If you are experiencing trigger finger, contact us today to schedule an appointment.